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NASA find traces of planet collision

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A Nasa space telescope has found evidence of a high-speed collision between two burgeoning planets orbiting a young star.

Astronomers say the cosmic smash-up is similar to the one that formed our Moon some four billion years ago, when a Mars-sized object crashed into Earth.

In this case, two rocky bodies are thought to have slammed into one another in the last few thousand years.
Details are to be published in the Astrophysical Journal.

The collision involved one object that was at least as big as our Moon and another that was at least as big as Mercury.

The impact destroyed the smaller body, vaporising huge amounts of rock and flinging plumes of hot lava into space.

Infrared detectors on Nasa's Spitzer Space Telescope were able to pick up the signatures of the vaporised rock, along with fragments of hardened lava, known as tektites.

Full story http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8195467.stm

The technology that NASA is using is just awesome!!!!!!




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Tell you what Jess, NASA are just awesome in theirselves!!

The technology they use is groundbreaking itself, let alone top secret, but dont you wish you could be on the control floor of NASA, sat there with the scientists, Generals, Geeks and all that, just to say you'd been there??

Hell yeah, I would!!!

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OMG Gumbie - too right!!!!! I bet Martyn would love it as well!




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Jessica Rabbit wrote:OMG Gumbie - too right!!!!! I bet Martyn would love it as well!


I'd love to visit the Johnson Space Center where all the science, training and mission controls are. Texas is not really a place I see myself visiting though, think I will stick to looking around KSC, one of my favourite places on Earth.




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martyn20 wrote:
Jessica Rabbit wrote:OMG Gumbie - too right!!!!! I bet Martyn would love it as well!


I'd love to visit the Johnson Space Center where all the science, training and mission controls are. Texas is not really a place I see myself visiting though, think I will stick to looking around KSC, one of my favourite places on Earth.


I am not sure we will ever get out there but it would be amazing.

We are planning to go to the Leicester Space Centre at some point. NOOOO comparison with KSC of course but I am still fascinated to go. Has anyone been and is it worth a trip? I am just really getting into the subject so it may provide a basic introduction.




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Jessica Rabbit wrote:We are planning to go to the Leicester Space Centre at some point. NOOOO comparison with KSC of course but I am still fascinated to go. Has anyone been and is it worth a trip? I am just really getting into the subject so it may provide a basic introduction.


Not been to Kennedy (though upon reflection I should have done as I was based just a few hundred miles away for a short while).
But I have been to the Smithsonian in Washington which has more bits of paraphenalia within, but is more aeronautical than true spaceflight. Still they do have lunar rock and a shuttle. A good day out, and somewhat cheaper to get to than Texas.

http://www.nasm.si.edu/museum/

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Channel Hopper wrote:
Jessica Rabbit wrote:We are planning to go to the Leicester Space Centre at some point. NOOOO comparison with KSC of course but I am still fascinated to go. Has anyone been and is it worth a trip? I am just really getting into the subject so it may provide a basic introduction.


Not been to Kennedy (though upon reflection I should have done as I was based just a few hundred miles away for a short while).
But I have been to the Smithsonian in Washington which has more bits of paraphenalia within, but is more aeronautical than true spaceflight. Still they do have lunar rock and a shuttle. A good day out, and somewhat cheaper to get to than Texas.

http://www.nasm.si.edu/museum/


I am going to get to Washington in the next few years and I will so be visiting the Smithsonian, of course it's not a 'real shuttle' although it is, well not really, well sort of. :thumb:




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martyn20 wrote:I am going to get to Washington in the next few years and I will so be visiting the Smithsonian, of course it's not a 'real shuttle' although it is, well not really, well sort of. :thumb:



Hey, she flew (well glided), just didn't go into space so no scorch marks.
Good enough for me.

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martyn20 wrote:
Channel Hopper wrote:
Jessica Rabbit wrote:We are planning to go to the Leicester Space Centre at some point. NOOOO comparison with KSC of course but I am still fascinated to go. Has anyone been and is it worth a trip? I am just really getting into the subject so it may provide a basic introduction.


Not been to Kennedy (though upon reflection I should have done as I was based just a few hundred miles away for a short while).
But I have been to the Smithsonian in Washington which has more bits of paraphenalia within, but is more aeronautical than true spaceflight. Still they do have lunar rock and a shuttle. A good day out, and somewhat cheaper to get to than Texas.

http://www.nasm.si.edu/museum/


I am going to get to Washington in the next few years and I will so be visiting the Smithsonian, of course it's not a 'real shuttle' although it is, well not really, well sort of. :thumb:


I've been to the National Air and space Museum in Washington DC. I spent two whole days there. Amazing. The 'air' section is not to be sniffed at either.

And while your their just down the road is the Natural history Museum which is also incredible. Then round the corner is the place where they print the dollars. And the Whitehouse, and the huge obelisk, bla de bla de bla. You should spend a whole weekthere is poss otherwise you'll regret it if you miss something!!!

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Jessica Rabbit wrote:A Nasa space telescope has found evidence of a high-speed collision between two burgeoning planets orbiting a young star.

Astronomers say the cosmic smash-up is similar to the one that formed our Moon some four billion years ago, when a Mars-sized object crashed into Earth.


I'm always amazed and frankly quite scared how we just wouldn't be here if it wasn't for so many events. If these bodies hadn't collided the Original earth would have had a different orbit and it could have been unlikely that life would have evolved. but then had it been the 'neighbouring sperm' that had made it first for each of us then none of us would be here.


In this case, two rocky bodies are thought to have slammed into one another in the last few thousand years.
Details are to be published in the Astrophysical Journal.

The collision involved one object that was at least as big as our Moon and another that was at least as big as Mercury.

The impact destroyed the smaller body, vaporising huge amounts of rock and flinging plumes of hot lava into space.

Infrared detectors on Nasa's Spitzer Space Telescope were able to pick up the signatures of the vaporised rock, along with fragments of hardened lava, known as tektites.

Full story http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8195467.stm

The technology that NASA is using is just awesome!!!!!!


The great news with all this technology, for the first time in history organisms on the planet are able to detect in advance an approaching body that could collide with us and hopefully do something about it. The dinosaurs 65 million years ago didn't have that luxury!!!

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