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[updated] Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 3:02 pm
by annie27

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 3:08 pm
by wotsit2
whats it about please annie ?

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 5:02 pm
by smeggypants
Is it any coincidence that the guy at 0:35 looks like Dick Cheney?

@Wots. its' the Big Brother implant chip. Have one of these things implanted and sensors aroudn the country will trwack you whereever you go and have the potential to control you

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 5:10 pm
by wotsit2
smeggypants wrote:Is it any coincidence that the guy at 0:35 looks like Dick Cheney?

@Wots. its' the Big Brother implant chip. Have one of these things implanted and sensors aroudn the country will trwack you whereever you go and have the potential to control you

i'm controlled anyway , i didn't notify my change of address, the DWP still found me

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 5:42 pm
by smeggypants
Yeah but with a chip 'they' could prevent you from entering certain zones, or buying certain goods, etc,etc

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 5:56 pm
by Channel Hopper
RFIDs have always had their uses in surveillance.

Their introduction is often advertised as a benefit to the common public (logistics, anti-shoplifting, alternative to carrying cash etc.) but once you understand the technology and how product tracking data from manufacture to final destination is useful for more reasons than just theft and restocking, then the meaning behind the video becomes clear.

How many here are Oyster card users ?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03/17 ... nt_oyster/

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 2:40 am
by annie27
and when the planned Currency crisis hits ......get ready to swipe your wrist :D but if you are know to disagree with the government ....well they might turn yours off .. ;) or deny you certain purchases .

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 2:57 am
by smeggypants
Channel Hopper wrote:RFIDs have always had their uses in surveillance.

Their introduction is often advertised as a benefit to the common public (logistics, anti-shoplifting, alternative to carrying cash etc.) but once you understand the technology and how product tracking data from manufacture to final destination is useful for more reasons than just theft and restocking, then the meaning behind the video becomes clear.

How many here are Oyster card users ?

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03/17 ... nt_oyster/


And of course the congestion charge is another way of conveniently tracking everyone who enters London whether you paid or not.

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 3:12 am
by annie27
I guess if you want to avoid BB 1984 cash is king :D when you think if you pay by debit everything you buy is on record ..... ;)

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 5:19 am
by smeggypants
All money in existence is debt. Somebody somewhere is paying back the loan+usury on the £10 in your pocket. Avoid credit ( debt ) - save up to buy the stuff you want. An obvious exception is the house, but we really need a state run interest free mortgage system.

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 2:36 pm
by Gunner 51
annie27 wrote:I guess if you want to avoid BB 1984 cash is king :D when you think if you pay by debit everything you buy is on record ..... ;)


I'm way ahead of you on that one. I never liked all that Chip and PIN malarky - especially when when it shows up on bank statements.

Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2010 5:50 pm
by smeggypants
We should trade in sheep.

[updated] Chips Anyone ???

PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2010 6:01 pm
by smeggypants
rather than start a new thread ....

Preparation for getting us comfortable with chip implants progresses ... That's all you need isn't it. have your chip implanted and then contract a 'back door' trojan the next day :rofl:

First human 'infected with computer virus'



A British scientist says he is the first man in the world to become infected with a computer virus.

Dr Mark Gasson from the University of Reading contaminated a computer chip which was then inserted into his hand.

The device, which enables him to pass through security doors and activate his mobile phone, is a sophisticated version of ID chips used to tag pets.

In trials, Dr Gasson showed that the chip was able to pass on the computer virus to external control systems.

If other implanted chips had then connected to the system they too would have been corrupted, he said.
Medical alert

Dr Gasson admits that the test is a proof of principle but he thinks it has important implications for a future where medical devices such as pacemakers and cochlear implants become more sophisticated, and risk being contaminated by other human implants.

"With the benefits of this type of technology come risks. We may improve ourselves in some way but much like the improvements with other technologies, mobile phones for example, they become vulnerable to risks, such as security problems and computer viruses."

However, Dr Gasson predicts that wider use will be made of implanted technology.

"This type of technology has been commercialised in the United States as a type of medical alert bracelet, so that if you're found unconscious you can be scanned and your medical history brought up."

Professor Rafael Capurro of the Steinbeis-Transfer-Institute of Information Ethics in Germany told BBC News that the research was "interesting".

"If someone can get online access to your implant, it could be serious," he said.
Cosmetic surgery

Professor Capurro contributed to a 2005 ethical study for the European Commission that looked at the development of digital implants and possible abuse of them.

"From an ethical point of view, the surveillance of implants can be both positive and negative," he said.

"Surveillance can be part of medical care, but if someone wants to do harm to you, it could be a problem."

In addition, he said, that there should be caution if implants with surveillance capabilities started to be used outside of a medical setting.

However, Dr Gasson believes that there will be a demand for these non-essential applications, much as people pay for cosmetic surgery.

"If we can find a way of enhancing someone's memory or their IQ then there's a real possibility that people will choose to have this kind of invasive procedure."

Dr Gasson works at the University of Reading's School of Systems Engineering and will present the results of his research at the International Symposium for Technology and Society in Australia next month. Professor Capurro will also talk at the event. Article Source